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Monday's raids of attorney Michael Cohen's home and office followed a referral by U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who for almost a year has been looking into whether the Trump campaign colluded with Moscow.

The investigation of Cohen, which was referred by special counsel Robert Mueller to the US attorney's office for the Southern District of NY, appears to be focused in part on the lawyer's involvement with payments made to two women who alleged affairs with Trump.

Trump has denounced the raid as a "disgrace", an "attack" on the nation, and "a witch-hunt".

The document was filed publicly after lawyers for Cohen appeared before U.S. District Judge Kimba M. Wood to ask that they, not Department of Justice lawyers, be given the first crack at reviewing the seized evidence to see whether it was relevant to the investigation or could be forwarded to criminal investigators without jeopardizing attorney-client privilege. The lawyers said they should be allowed to identify which of the documents are protected by attorney-client privilege before prosecutors get to look at them.

A lawyer for President Trump argued Friday for a delay in reviewing the potential evidence seized during Federal Bureau of Investigation raids targeting his personal attorney earlier this week.

"When you're a star, they let you do it", Trump says in the video, speaking to "Access Hollywood" host Billy Bush.

None of those emails, they added, was exchanged with Trump.

Cohen wasn't present for the hearing.

The search warrant also sought evidence of whether the lawyer, Michael D. Cohen, tried to suppress damaging information about Mr. Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Stormy Daniels' lawyer Michael Avenatti was also in the courtroom.

In their search warrant, federal investigators asked Cohen to turn over any communications the two men had about a 2005 "Access Hollywood" tape that captured Trump boasting about grabbing women's body parts, according to a person familiar with the investigation.

McDougal was paid $150,000 in the summer of 2016 by the parent company of the National Enquirer under an agreement that gave it the exclusive rights to her story, which it never published.


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